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Placing Objects In Environments by hibbary Placing Objects In Environments by hibbary
For my Resource Wednesdays done on my patreon:  www.patreon.com/posts/4122267
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:iconpsychopomp16:
Psychopomp16 Featured By Owner Nov 17, 2016
That was really informative and straight forward.  Excellent education! Thank you
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:iconshembre:
Shembre Featured By Owner Mar 24, 2016  Professional General Artist
Wonderful! Thank you :love:
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:iconkovowolf:
KovoWolf Featured By Owner Mar 24, 2016  Professional General Artist
Awesome :)
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:iconprezaurian:
prezaurian Featured By Owner Mar 24, 2016  Hobbyist General Artist
Thanks so much for sharing this!
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:iconplugin848y:
Plugin848y Featured By Owner Mar 24, 2016  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Thanks for sharing!
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:iconmarbletoast:
Marbletoast Featured By Owner Mar 24, 2016  Hobbyist General Artist
There is something pretty eerie about that floating sphere in the dark forest in the last example. :'D 

Great summary!
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:iconhibbary:
hibbary Featured By Owner Mar 24, 2016  Professional General Artist
It wants to steal your soooooouuuulllll D8
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:iconvhardamis:
Vhardamis Featured By Owner Mar 24, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Thank you for sharing this.
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:iconaveoxus:
Aveoxus Featured By Owner Mar 24, 2016  Professional General Artist
That's a nice little reference point lol
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:iconrujiidragon:
rujiidragon Featured By Owner Mar 23, 2016  Student General Artist
This is really great hibbary! I hope this isn't a stupid question but, one thing I have trouble is with putting, well anything, on a page compositely to make it look professional. Would rendering it in a way to suit the background fix it, or is there something you think about when putting an object there? Like in your examples I would have never have thought to put the red balls where you placed them, I would have used the rule of thirds and it would still look super stiff. In a few of them it seems you broke the rule of thirds but it still looks super appealing and works perfectly, how did you do this?

(Also I have a suggestion for a tutorial topic, could you explain drawing "through"form? I hear it all the time but I still can never "see" an object with simple shapes or know how to draw transparent shapes to fit the occasion no matter how hard I try. And I draw simple shapes constantly.)
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:iconhibbary:
hibbary Featured By Owner Mar 24, 2016  Professional General Artist
So basically you're having a problem with composition? I do think about the rule of thirds a lot, but sometimes if you are directing the flow of the image in a certain way you have to break that rule. Composition is all about how the eye enters the image and then moves through it. You don't want your gaze to sit in one corner or off of the image. You want it to circulate, or at least cross the entire thing. The multiple orbs work because it reads as a kind of stillframe animation where a single ball is captured traveling back in space. You see the near ball and follow the curve into the background. So not only is your eye moving from left to right, it's also moving from front to back, which is difficult to do in a 2D medium. You have to really understand and utilize depth of field to make it feel like a Space, and not just a flat image. 

So there's a lot more going into composition than following the Rule of Thirds, though it's a very good guide to go by.
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:iconrujiidragon:
rujiidragon Featured By Owner Mar 25, 2016  Student General Artist
Composition is something I have had a lot of trouble with. I've heard of a lot of "rules" like make a focal point, like you said use depth, and direct the eye but when it comes to doing that, I have no idea what to do. Like playing a game and it tells you to press the action button without telling you what the action button is. Rule of thirds was the only one that made sense, put your objects on these lines and you'll be safe, but everything else is just too abstract. I read the only book on composition I could find, (framed ink) and still couldn't understand it. I can use perspective to make an image look 3D but I have no idea how to stage the objects in the 3D space in an appealing 2D arrangement. 
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:iconhibbary:
hibbary Featured By Owner Mar 25, 2016  Professional General Artist
Some people really like memorizing a lot of rules and theory but it doesn't have to be that way. It can be a holistic experience where you just work on your image and if something doesn't 'feel' right you change it until it does. You just have to glance at the image and see where your eye goes. If it sits in a corner or shoots right off the page, change the visual elements so it stays in the image. The more you experiment the more you learn what seems right without necessarily having to intellectualize it. 
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:iconrujiidragon:
rujiidragon Featured By Owner Mar 25, 2016  Student General Artist
So I should just experiment until it looks right? I always thought the whole point of learning theory was to memorize them until they became second nature like learning anatomy and figure drawing or color theory. I remember hearing somewhere "nature is random, composition isn't." For me when I see an image I don't feel my eye going anywhere, I just see it how it is I can't tell where my eye goes even in art I like.  Especially in drawings where there is only one character and no background. 
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:iconhibbary:
hibbary Featured By Owner Mar 25, 2016  Professional General Artist
My point is that you don't *have* to learn theory if you work out composition on your own. For some people, reinventing the wheel is how they understand wheels. The theory is good to know but isn't the end-all, be-all, and a lot about making art is just going with your gut, or it turns out stiff and soulless. Figuring out an image's composition through trial and error isn't being random; it's working through problems as they come up rather than planning around them from the get-go. It's a method a lot of painters use to keep their work fresh. There isn't any magic knowledge that is suddenly going to make your composition good. You have to make shitty compositions and actively fix them to learn the difference, either through theory or through instinct. Sometimes something will work and when you ask 'why?' your answer is 'I don't fucking know why!' That doesn't mean it isn't working. You just log the information subconsciously instead of intellectually.
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:iconrujiidragon:
rujiidragon Featured By Owner Mar 25, 2016  Student General Artist
That is a good point about reinventing the wheel, my only problem with trial and error is, with my experience I feel I can't see my problems, its like as if my eyes just slowly excepted them and now since all my education is trail and error I don't know weather or not I'm ingraining a good habit or a bad one. Its like I have constant delusions of grandeur. I'll look at my work and know it looks like crap and unprofessional but I have no idea how to make it better. 
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:iconhibbary:
hibbary Featured By Owner Mar 25, 2016  Professional General Artist
Yeah I get what you mean. Well link me to a few images and maybe I can help. 
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(1 Reply)
:icongrieverjoe:
Grieverjoe Featured By Owner Mar 23, 2016
Very useful. Thank you for sharing. :)
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:iconsn2:
SN2 Featured By Owner Mar 23, 2016
thank you for this wonderful tutorial; especially the night one 
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:iconbear48:
bear48 Featured By Owner Mar 23, 2016  Professional
nice 
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:iconpsychedeliczen:
psychedeliczen Featured By Owner Mar 23, 2016  Professional Traditional Artist
Great tutorial!
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:icondaisyvayle:
Daisyvayle Featured By Owner Mar 23, 2016  Hobbyist General Artist
Thank you so much for such a helpful tutorial. Simply explained but very effective! These tips will be very useful for me in the future.
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:iconhullumel:
HulluMel Featured By Owner Mar 23, 2016   Digital Artist
This is very useful. Thank you!
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:iconcaptain-savvy:
Captain-Savvy Featured By Owner Mar 23, 2016  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Thank you for this!
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:icontaokyuubimon:
TaoKyuubimon Featured By Owner Mar 23, 2016
Depth of field is always something that seems kind of small but is really effective in pulling together an illustration. Very nice examples.
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:iconsolarlugia:
SolarLugia Featured By Owner Mar 23, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
This is a really cool tutorial, and certainly very useful!
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:iconmackanga:
Mackanga Featured By Owner Mar 23, 2016  Student Digital Artist
Amazing tutorial!
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:icontheriversedge:
TheRiversEdge Featured By Owner Mar 23, 2016  Hobbyist General Artist
Oh man, this is just the kind of tutorial I've been looking for! This is definitely something I struggle with, and this really helped, so thank you!
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